Archive for August, 2019


pirate_dayGot plans for September 19, 2019? You do now: It’s International Talk Like a Pirate Day! So prepare your timbers to be shivered and wait… what? Is this seriously a holiday? What is this all about? And why, exactly, is there a formal holiday for not just pirates but for talking like pirates? You have questions. I have (weird) answers.

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boycott1Market Forces: Ordinary people can often feel powerless to do good through individual actions. That’s where community organizing tactics such as labor strikes and consumer boycotts  including the recent boycott against fitness companies Equinox and SoulCycle  can come in, with citizens applying economic pressure against organizations perpetuating injustices by refusing to buy their products or services. Many boycotts fizzle out with little effect, while others get results by stopping the problematic behavior or simply calling attention to an underlying issue.

Click ahead to see some of the most powerful boycotts in history, some long gone and others still ongoing.

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1776: The battle of Brooklyn

pic1During the American Revolution, British forces under General William Howe and his brother, Admiral Richard Viscount Howe, defeat Patriot forces under General George Washington at the Battle of Brooklyn in New York, also known as the Battle of Long Island.

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styleIn 2016, it was muted monochromatic makeup. The next year ushered in a spectrum of sunset reds and dusty pinks, and 2018 was the year of technicolor highlighter. With bold beauty trends on the rise, it’s no surprise that 2019 has been declared the year of neon. Pinterest reports that searches for “neon eye shadow” jumped a whopping 842% over the past few months. For fans, especially Gen Zers, the look is a celebration of fun, commitment-free expression: Daydream, create, wash it off, and repeat. But what happens when experimenting with the latest beauty trends could put your health at risk?

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cat_likes_youCats have a reputation for being difficult to read but there are several ways they can show their affection. Grooming behaviors such as licking the hair or ears signals that a cat trusts that person. Subtle signs like a slow blink also signal a cat’s love for a human.

With their inscrutable faces and reputation for acting indifferent to their human keepers, cats can be difficult to read.  Sure, they might not show their love with wagging tails and slobbery kisses like dogs. But that’s because felines have their own ways of communicating their affection.  Here are a few behaviors that show a cat really likes you. (more…)


70_remembersHere’s one thing everybody who was alive during the 1970s can agree on: The entire decade still feels like it only happened yesterday. Seriously, how can the ’70s be four decades ago? It’s just not possible that the era ruled by bell bottom jeans and 8-track cassettes was nearly half a century ago. For those of us who lived through it, and survived that groovy and perilous time it will forever be a part of our souls. Here are things that, if you were alive during the 1970s, you probably still remember. (And chances are, you’re also still shocked that those born in the ’80s, ’90, and gulp, the 2000s don’t.)

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chickory_plantIf you’ve ever had the experience of drinking chicory coffee (and chances are, you were in New Orleans when you drank it), you might’ve had to wonder just exactly what chicory even is. For the record, chicory is this pretty flowering plant.

But underneath the plant is its root, and that’s the stuff that we’re going to talk about today. The root is what gets roasted and ground to be brewed with coffee in some parts of the world.

But how and why does this stuff end up in our coffee? It’s all rooted (pun not intended) in world history, a little bit of tradition and a whole lot of politics and economic hardships. For most of our coffee-drinking past, the addictive caffeinated beverage has been expensive. There weren’t always Starbucks and Dunkin’ Donuts competing on every street corner. Sometimes coffee was scarce — especially if a major port was blocked for political reasons.

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