Posts Tagged ‘Recipes’


coleman_mustard_powder“Many people think that the ‘heat’ in Colman’s comes from the addition of horseradish, but there’s no horseradish in it. The pungency comes from the mustard seeds themselves.” Mustard grows wild in many parts of the world, from Europe to Asia.

Drop a dab of this yellow dynamite on your naked tongue, and in less than two seconds you’ll feel the heat in your sinuses like the afterburner from a jet engine.

“It’ll blow your socks off and make you breathe better than you have in years,” laughed Sheela Kadam, co-owner of The British Emporium, a specialty food store in Grapevine, Texas, where Colman’s mustard is a staple item on the shelves.

The Colman’s company calls its hot mustard “The Not-So-Mellow Yellow.” And indeed, one taste of this fiery English condiment will convince you that not all British food is as bland and boring as it’s reputed to be.

“Colman’s is the classic ‘clean’ English mustard, where all the heat comes from the mustard itself,” said Barry Levenson, curator of the Mount Horeb Mustard Museum in Wisconsin. “Many people think that the ‘heat’ in Colman’s comes from the addition of horseradish, but there’s no horseradish in it. The pungency comes from the mustard seeds themselves.”

From a Tiny Mustard Seed

mustard_seedsMustard grows wild in many parts of the world, from Europe to Asia. It was cultivated by the ancient Greeks and also mentioned in the Bible. Mustard has been grown in England since Roman times, but it wasn’t until 1720 that a process was developed in England for grinding and sifting the oily seeds to produce a dry spice with the texture and consistency of milled wheat flour.

The real popularity of mustard powder in Britain dates from a century later, in 1814, when Jeremiah Colman—a flour miller himself—first created his own pungent blend of ground-up brown and white mustard seeds at a water mill in Stoke Holy Cross, south of Norwich, England. The product was soon a commercial success, and Colman’s business continued to grow. In the early 1850s, the Colman’s mustard factory relocated to the outskirts of Norwich, where it remains a center of mustard production today.

Colman’s mustard was originally manufactured as a dry powder, or mustard “flour,” that could be used either as a spice itself or mixed with water (or other liquids) to produce “made” mustard, for use as a cooking ingredient or table condiment. Later the company also started producing its own “made” mustard, the condiment that is now called “prepared,” “wet,” or “pre-mixed” mustard. This beloved British condiment is often served in little ceramic mustard pots, at home and in restaurants, as an accompaniment to roast beef and other cooked meats.

For decades Colman’s dry mustard powder has been packaged in a distinctive yellow “tin”—a re-usable metal spice box—with bright red lettering and the company’s bull’s-head logo on the front. The “prepared” version, marketed as Colman’s Original English Mustard, comes in glass jars. Both products are available at most gourmet food shops and large supermarkets in the United States, although you might find the dry powder located in the spice section of the store and the prepared mustard on the shelves with other similar “wet” condiments.

Use It, Don’t Lose It

coleman_mustard_spreadThe beauty of having dry mustard in your kitchen cabinet is that you can make it up at a moment’s notice, I recommend combining equal parts of Colman’s dry mustard and a liquid such as water, wine, vinegar, beer, milk, or cream, then letting the mixture stand for ten minutes, for the full flavor to develop, before using it. “I’ve even heard of people mixing it with champagne!"

Wet or dry, Colman’s mustard can give a flavorful kick to casseroles, soups, stews, sauces, relishes, dips, marinades, and many other recipes. Stir a tablespoon of the prepared mustard into a cup of mayonnaise, for a spicy sandwich spread. Add a teaspoon of it to your favorite salad dressing. Use it to perk up baked beans.

Just don’t slather gobs of Colman’s all over your hamburger or hot dog, unless your tongue is coated with asbestos. A little goes a long way.

Colman’s is also an essential ingredient in classic deviled eggs. “The British food term for something that is ‘deviled,’ like eggs or sauces, stems from the addition of hot mustard to the dish,” It suggests that there was a bit of devilry going on in the kitchen, or that the devil had a hand in it.”

I also found a mouthwatering use of Colman’s dry mustard for making English roasted potatoes. “Peel the potatoes, cut them into chunks, and parboil them until they’re half-cooked. Then rub them with olive oil, some salt and black pepper, and plenty of Colman’s dry mustard powder. Place them in the pan around a chicken or joint of beef, and roast them in the oven, basting the meat and potatoes with the meat juices as they cook. When done, these potatoes come out all crispy, with a wonderfully flavored crust.”

Connoisseurs’ Cult

The enthusiasm for Colman’s mustard has grown into a cult of connoisseurs in Britain and abroad. Several websites (see Sources) also offer a variety of Colman’s products for purchase online, along with recipes, cooking tips, and souvenirs.

Colman’s souvenirs? That’s right. You can buy all sorts of products sporting the Colman’s logo, from aprons, tea towels, and mugs, to mousepads, wristwatches, and teddy bears. One of my favorites is a bright yellow ceramic mustard pot shaped and painted like a tin of Colman’s mustard. The best selection of these souvenirs can be found at Colman’s own quaint Mustard Shop in the historic city center of Norwich, England. Inside this replica of a Victorian spice store, you’ll find a mustard museum in the back and plenty of Colman’s food products, memorabilia, and gift items for sale in the front. Some of those souvenirs are also sold on the Internet.

No matter how you cut the mustard, Colman’s “not-so-mellow yellow” is hot stuff!

Recipes

Mustardly Deviled Eggs

These spicy appetizers are perfect to serve with a casual brunch or even a picnic. For an even spicier recipe, add a teaspoon or two of habanero hot sauce.

  • 6 large hard-boiled eggs, shelled
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon grated onion
  • 2 tablespoons English Red Mustard (see recipe)

Salt and pepper to taste

Cut the eggs lengthwise in half. Scoop out the yolks and place them in a boql. Mash the yolks with a fork and add the mayonnaise, onion and the English Red Mustard and mix well. Add salt and pepper to taste. Divide the fillling among the egg halves, mounding it slightly. Garnish with dried pepper flakes or paprika powder. Arrange the eggs on a platter, cover, and refrigerate.

Yield: 3 servings

Heat Scale: Mild

Mustard Barbecue Glaze

This recipe comes directly from Colman’s. Use it to finish pork or lamb chops on the grill.

  • 1/2 cup beef or chicken stock
  • 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons Colman’s dry
  • (powdered) mustard
  • 2 tablespoons tomato puree
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons freshly grated orange peel
  • 2 teaspoons freshly grated gingerroot
  • 1 garlic clove, put through a garlic press

Whisk all of the ingredients together in a small bowl. Use as a sauce to mop over pork, beef, or chicken on the grill or in a barbecue smoker.

Yield: 3/4 cup

Heat Scale: Medium hot

Hot Crab Dip

This recipe also comes directly from Colman’s. Use the dip with crackers, tortilla or potato chips, or sliced celery or carrots.

  • 8 ounces cream cheese
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 1 tablespoon Colman’s dry
  • (powdered) mustard
  • 1 tablespoon confectioners’ sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 8 ounces lump crabmeat

Combine all of the ingredients except the crabmeat in a heavy-bottomed saucepan and cook over medium-low heat, stirring constantly, until the cheese has melted and the mixture is well combined. Add the crabmeat and heat until warm. Serve warm.

Yield: Approximately 2 cups

Heat Scale: Medium

English Red Mustard

This recipe comes from Mount Horeb Mustard Museum. If you want it really hot, use piquin chiles.

  • 4 tablespoons cracked brown mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons Colman’s dry
  • (powdered) mustard
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 small dried hot red peppers, crushed
  • 1/4 cup cold water
  • 1/4 cup beer

Whisk together the dry ingredients in a small bowl, then whisk in the water and beer until the mixture is smooth. Cover and refrigerate for 2 days, for the mustard to thicken and “ripen” before using. Store in a tightly covered jar in the refrigerator.

Yield: Approximately 1/2 cup

Heat Scale: Hot

NOTES: You can order this mustard from Walmart and Amazon with free shipping, I recommend Walmart

Mark Boudreaux’s Cajun Jambalaya

Posted: January 30, 2017 in Recipes
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Jambalaya, a Cajun/Creole dish, is perhaps the most versatile main dish that Louisiana has to offer. The most important thing with this dish is to use the right equipment; any heavy bottomed cast iron pot or Dutch oven.

jambalayaIngredients

1 pound Andouille (Cajun) or mild smoked pork sausage, sliced 1/4-inch thick
1 1/2 pound boneless skinless chicken thigh meat, cubed
1 pound ground Italian sausage (mild)
1 pound cubed ham
2 cups onions, diced
1 cup bell pepper
2 tbsp minced fresh garlic
1/2 cup Old Bays Seafood seasoning (in all), divided
1/2 tbsp ground black pepper
1/2 tbsp white pepper
1/2 tbsp red pepper
3/4 tbsp thyme leaves
3/4 tbsp basil leaves
3 to 4 medium bay leaves
5 cups chicken stock
1 beer
3 cups long grain rice
1/2 cup chopped parsley leaves

Directions

Season chicken thighs generously with Old Bay the night before.

Use high heat to preheat the pot and add the sausage. With a large spoon, constantly move the sausage from the bottom of the pot. Brown the sausage but be careful not to burn the meat; remove sausage.

Using excess sausage drippings, brown the chicken on all sides (you may need to add some oil to pan to sauté). Again use the spoon to scrape the meat from sticking and burning to the bottom of the pot. Be careful not to over cook the thigh meat to the point that it shreds; remove thighs.

Add Italian sausage and start to brown adding onions and bell peppers when sausage is halfway browned. (You may need to add a little oil again).

Add red, black and white peppers to mixture and cook until veggies are translucent, about 5-7 minutes over medium-high heat. Again use the spoon to scrape the meat from sticking and burning to the bottom of the pot.

Add the ham and garlic and cook for another minute stirring and scraping bottom of pot to not scorch garlic. Add the remaining Old Bay seasoning, thyme, basil and bay leaves; stir. Return chicken and sausage to pot; mix and fold. Cook over low heat for 10 minutes. This will give the seasonings time to release their oils and flavors.

Add beer to deglaze pan scraping about 2 minutes. Add the stock and bring to a boil. Add the rice and fold in. Return to a slow boil and cook uncovered for about 5 minutes stirring and scraping pan bottom so rice does not stick and burn to pan bottom; mix in parsley. Reduce heat to the lowest possible setting and simmer, covered, for at least 30-35 minutes. Do not remove the cover while the rice is steaming.

After uncovering there may be some liquid remaining on top. Fold the rice in (DO NOT STIR). Turn off heat and let stand till liquid is absorbed. Remove bay leaves. Enjoy!

Classic Boudin (Boudoin)

Posted: January 30, 2017 in Recipes
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I bet you thought I was going to leave you hanging for those who cannot get Boudin for the Boudin balls recipe previously posted

This is the best classic boudin out there. Boudin is also spelled “boudoin.” Both are proper spellings of the same classic Cajun dish.

boudinIngredients

10 lbs pork roast (pork butt roast works)
4 medium onions
5 shallots
2 bell peppers
3 bunches green onion, chopped fine
1 bunch fresh parsley, chopped fine
1 tsp white pepper
2 tbsp salt
1 1/2 tbsp black pepper
5 tbsp cayenne
9 3/4 cup cooked rice
1 package of casing

Directions

In a large stockpot combine the pork roast, 5 whole shallots, 3 whole onions, and 2 whole bell peppers with enough water to cover the entire contents of pot. Boil until the meat begins to separate from the bone. Remove roast from water and then trim the fat from meat. Reserve stock.

With a meat grinder, grind together the meat with the boiled onions, shallots and peppers. Also grind in one additional raw onion.

Return the meat mixture to the pot and add the green onion and parsley, both chopped fine. Add the white pepper, salt, black pepper and cayenne. Stir thoroughly.

Add the cooked rice to the mixture and keep the consistency "wet" but not too wet to handle. Stuff the boudoin mixture into the casing, make boudoin balls or eat as a rice dressing. Boudoin is often enjoyed with cracklins.

Because this recipe makes a substantial amount of boudoin, most of it will likely be frozen for future use. To thaw the boudoin, heat water to boiling in a large pot and place boudoin in the pot and boil for 10 minutes. Remove and serve. Or, if making boudoin balls, roll in a small amount of breadcrumbs before freezing. To thaw, deep fat fry until golden brown or cook in the oven at 350 for 20 minutes turning balls once.

Boudin Balls

Posted: January 30, 2017 in Recipes
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deep_fried_boudin_ballsIngredients

Boudin
Crushed crackers
2 eggs (optional)
1/4 to 1/2 cup milk (optional)
Salt, cayenne, black pepper, to taste
Oil for frying

Directions

Make your boudin, see our recipe. Or, if using the store purchased variety, remove the meat mixture from the casing. Roll the mixture into balls a little smaller than an egg; actually any size.

There are two ways to make these and two ways to cook them.
Method 1. Crush your crackers to a fine meal consistency and season to taste. Or you can buy any flavored crackers. Take the boudin balls and roll them in the cracker meal. Refrigerate for 1 to 2 hours.Heat the cooking oil until a small amount of flour dropped in sizzles on top of the oil. Drop the boudin ball and fry until golden brown. Place on paper towels to drain. Serve warm but it tastes great even when cold.OR preheat oven to 375 degrees. Place the balls on a cookie sheet and cook for 20 to 25 minutes until golden brown, turning halfway thru the cooking process.

Method 2. Combine the milk and egg in a glass bowl. Set aside.Crush your crackers to a fine meal consistency, season to taste. Or you can use flavored crackers. Roll the boudin balls in the cracker meal. Season to taste.Take the boudoin ball and first coat with the milk and egg mixture; then dredge in the cracker mixture. (You could do this step twice to get a really thick coating.) Place on a plate and refrigerate for 1 to 2 hours.Heat the cooking oil until a small amount of flour dropped in sizzles on top of the oil. Drop the boudin ball and fry until golden brown. Place on paper towels to drain. Serve warm but it tastes great even when cold.

Pork rinds compliments this dish very well.

History of King Cakes and recipe

Posted: January 23, 2017 in Recipes, Tutorials
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kingcakeThe Mardi Gras or Carnival season officially begins on January 6th or the "Twelfth Night," also known to Christians as the "Epiphany." Epiphany comes from a Greek word that means "to show." Jesus first showed himself to the three wise men and to the world on this day. As a symbol of this Holy Day, a tiny plastic baby is placed inside each King Cake
The King Cake tradition is thought to have been brought to New Orleans from France in 1870. A King Cake is an oval-shaped bakery delicacy, crossed between a coffee cake and a French pastry that is as rich in history as it is in flavor. It’s decorated in royal colors of PURPLE which signifies "Justice," GREEN for "Faith," and GOLD for "Power." These colors were chosen to resemble a jeweled crown honoring the Wise Men who visited the Christ Child on Epiphany. In the past such things as coins, beans, pecans, or peas were also hidden in each King Cake.

Today, a tiny plastic baby is the common prize. At a party, the King Cake is sliced and served. Each person looks to see if their piece contains the "baby." If so, then that person is named "King" for a day and bound by custom to host the next party and provide the King Cake.

Mardi Gras Day has a moveable date and may occur on any Tuesday from February 3rd to March 9th. It is always the day before Ash Wednesday, and always falls 46 days before Easter.

King Cake recipe

lge_kingcakeIngredients

1/2 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2 packages dry yeast
2 teaspoons sugar
4 to 5 cups flour
1/2 cup sugar
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon grated lemon rind
1/2 cup warm milk (105 to 115 degrees)
1/2 cup melted unsalted butter, cooled
5 egg yolks
1/2 cup finely chopped candied citron
1 pecan half, uncooked dried bean or King Cake Baby
Glaze:
2 cups sifted powdered sugar
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons water
Purple, green and gold sugar crystals

Directions

Preheat the oven 350 degrees. Combine the warm water, yeast and 2 teaspoons sugar in a small bowl. Mix well and set aside to a warm place for about 10 minutes. Combine the 4 cups of flour, 1/2 cup sugar, salt, nutmeg, lemon rind and add warm milk, melted butter, egg yolks and yeast mixture. Beat until smooth. Turn dough out on a lightly floured surface. Knead in enough remaining flour until the dough is no longer sticky. Continue kneading until the dough is smooth and elastic (about 10 minutes). Place the dough in a well-greased bowl. Turn once so greased surface is on top.
Cover the dough and let rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk (about 1 1/2 hours). Punch the dough down and place on a lightly floured surface. Sprinkle with the citron and knead until the citron is evenly distributed. Shape the dough into a cylinder, about 30 inches long. Place the cylinder on a buttered baking sheet. Shape into a ring, pinching ends together to seal. Place a well-greased 2-pound coffee can or shortening can in the center of the ring to maintain shape during baking. Press the King Cake Baby, pecan half or dried bean into the ring from the bottom so that it is completely hidden by the dough. Cover the ring with a towel, and let rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk, about 45 minutes.
Bake for 30 minutes, or until golden brown. Remove the coffee can immediately. Allow the cake to cool. For the glaze: Combine the ingredients and beat until smooth. To assemble, drizzle cake with the glaze. Sprinkle with sugar crystals, alternating colors.

Do I plan to attend the Mardi Gras Day  and the great parades? Oh yes I am! it’s not that far away for me to travel, I hope the battery power on my scooter can last as long as the parties, food and all the dancing in the streets, and I promise I won’t Martini glass and drive my scooter Fingers crossed

tx_to_new orleans

Bacon Asparagus Pastry Twists

Posted: January 19, 2017 in Recipes
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bacon_asparagusINGREDIENTS

Serves 2-3

1 sheet puff pastry, thawed
6-8 slices bacon
12-15 asparagus spears
1 egg, beaten
Salt
Pepper

 

 

PREPARATION

1. Preheat oven to 400°F/200°C.
2. Slice the puff pastry into 1-centimeter strips.
3. Slice the bacon in half lengthwise into thin strips.
4. Wrap a strip of bacon around an asparagus spear in a spiral.
5. Wrap a strip of puff pastry around the asparagus, looping it in between the bacon spiral.
6. Repeat with the rest of the asparagus.
7. Place the wrapped spears on a baking tray lined with parchment paper.
8. Brush them with egg wash, then sprinkle a pinch of salt & pepper on top.
9. Bake for 18 minutes, until golden brown and puffed.
10. Serve!

Smoked Sausage and Potato Bake

Posted: January 15, 2017 in Recipes
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sausage_and_potato_bakeYou’ll Need:

1 package of sliced Eckrich skinless smoked sausage.
8 quartered Yukon gold potatoes.
1 diced green pepper.
1 diced yellow pepper.
2 tbsps of butter.
1 tsp of oregano.
1 tsp of basil.
½ tsp of black pepper.
2 tsps of olive oil.

How to:

Preheat the oven to 375°.
In a pan, arrange the sausage, potatoes and peppers and place the butter over the top in small cubes. Drizzle with olive oil and season on top.
Bake covered for 40 to 50 minutes.
Bonne Appétit!

You can also use Ham instead of Sausage